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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 135 (some duplicates have been removed)
to help elect pro-choice women across this country. i am so proud to be one of nine emily's list women reelected in 2012 to the u.s. senate's and one of 20 women sworn in earlier this month, the most ever in our nation's history. no one runs for senate alone. no one runs for senate alone and wins. i was never alone, not for a singesingle minute. you were with me every single step of the day. back in may 2011 when the senator announced that he was retiring, i convened a conference call to figure out whether there was a way i could step up and run. just like you have been with me for so long, emily's list was there for me at that moment. you were there day one when i ran for the house of representatives bac in 1998. the pungent scent i cannot win. you read there with me. -- you were there with me every step of the way. i became the first woman to represents a woman in the house o. and on the first day of this long journey you were there for me with sage advice, plenty of encouragement and a commitment to stand with me every single day. you follow it through and then some. thousands of yo
may be, it is kind of strange states on the presidential election process. they have done everything in their power to be first. everybody wants to be fought over in a presidential election, everybody wants to monopolize the candidates and the nation's attention. so we're iowa, the first in the caucus, you have to spend tons of time here, we're new hampshire, the first primary, you have to spend tons of time here, mitt romney, you have to move here, you, too, john huntsman, we want all your attention. every state wants to do everything they can for the presidential candidates' attention, they all want a battle ground, they all want to be fought over. or at least they used to want to be fought over. something weird happened since the last election. and it is really starting to happen. i think you should know about it. in wisconsin and michigan and ohio and pennsylvania and virginia and florida, there is now noise that these states, which were at pretty hard fought in the presidential election, these were all battleground states, they're all fighting to make themselves less important i
and put people back to work. and despite that conversation, and despite the election results, the position that's been taken on the part of some house republicans is that, "no, we've got to do it our way, and if we don't, we simply won't pay america's bills." well, that can't be a position that is sustainable over time. it's not one that's good for the economy now. it's certainly not going to be the kind of precedent that i want to establish not just for my presidency, but for future presidents, even if it was on the other side. forocrats don't like voting the debt ceiling when a republican is president, and yet you -- but you never saw a situation in which democrats suggested somehow that we would go ahead and default if we didn't get 100 percent of our way. that's just not how it's supposed to work. jon karl. >> thank you, mr. president. on the issue of guns, given how difficult it will be -- some would say impossible -- to get any gun control measure passed through this congress, what are you willing or able to do, using the powers of your presidency, to act without congress? and i'd al
mile to assure the russians about future u.s. missile defense moves. >> after my election, i will be more flexible. >> it's going to be harder this time. i don't see where u.s./russian relations can productively go. that's going to be a big problem for the president, starting, of course, with syria. but ooh ran is the even bigger issue that is undecided. we have gotten some russian help, so far on iran. but it doesn't mean we will get russian help with the next step. >> the arab spring signaled the fall of middle-east leaders with whom u.s. officials had, for 30 years, cultivated careful relationships. president obama called on hosni mubarak to step down. >> a change must take place. >> allocated u.s. resources for a no-fly zone in libbia, leading to the killing of moammar khadafy. but while calling for bashir al-assad to step down, a war continues. >> overall, president obama's legacy toward the middle-east is one of limited american activism. that is carcaturd by how we handled egypt, libya, syria, iraq. >>. >> there are unanswered questions about the investigation into the
things done is to defeat the republicans in the midterm election, to just run on politics, tactically maneuver, defeat republicans, don't worry about the nation, and do what he wants to do in the final two years? >> i am for striking deals, if you watch that movie, lincoln, you're for striking deals -- i'm for cutting deals, but i'm not just for saying everybody should come together because here i am. kumbaya. >> when you say be ruthless, if a republican, if a tea party member said be ruthless people would be screaming at you. >> i said relentless but -- >> anderson said ruthless. >> i wasn't quoting. >> i'm sure i did use that word. what that means is cutting deals. instead of saying let's reason together, give them something and take something. in other words, do the realistic sometimes unpleasant work of running the country. >> and this is the magic that the movie "lincoln" illustrated. the passage of the 13th amendment happened in a far more polarized congress than the current congress we have. if they can do anything -- president obama is not going to have a major legacy piece in
. >> commissioners, item 8, election of the president of the small business commission. allows the commissioners to elect a member of the commission to serve as president of the commission, requires a motion and vote. >> commissioner o'brien? >> director, would you like me to read the procedures into the record? >> no, will you please read the procedures. >>> commissioner issues will read the procedures into the record. the commission will vote on president followed by vice president. for each position the secretary will call for nominations. the next nominees will provide statements and other commissioners will make comments. following this, the commission will hold public comments, finally the secretary will take a roll call vote in the order of those nominated. the first commissioner who receives four votes for each respective officer position will hold office for the next 12 months. if nobody does, the process will be re-opened and the process will be repeated. i have a tracking sheet that will be used to track the votes. >> commissioner o'brien? >> so at this point we can nominate, ri
of the election year, yet you don't have presidential candidates to have a vastly different approach to it. >> it is true that i think it is the increasingly become an issue, and the heartland of america, especially in the south. for instance in north carolina, there's been a huge increase in the latino population of north carolina, but most people don't understand how those latinos got there. it is a largely guatemalan migration, and its large the people who were recruited in the 1980's and 1990's to come and work in the textile mills of north carolina, because part of what i try to show in the book is the enormous connection between the needs of capital of american expanding industries in the u.s. and this recruitment of labor. what happened basically is in the 1980's, more salvadorans and guatemalans were flocking to the united states as a result of the civil wars and their country and repression in their country. they came here to the u.s. and there were industries that were needed for cheap labor. you have the meat packing industry in the midwest that began recruiting many mexicans to
, as well. this as you say was history. 16th president to win election to two consecutive terms and be sworn in. now, they have all the ceremonial swearings tomorrow. this more intimate friend in the blue room, family and close friends. amid all the constitutional moments there was also a light family moment where a dad got to talk to his daughter, take a listen. >> thank you sir. [ applause ] >> i did it. all right. thank you everybody. >> reporter: i did it, he said and sasha said you didn't mess up. vice president biden got to try this out first very early this morning. reason why it was so early is that just sotomayor had to get on to a train to go to new york city to sign her books. she was trying to get to barnes & noble this afternoon in new york city. >> gregg: you got to plug that book, that is more than the vice president of the united states. your publisher wants more book sales. [ laughter ] >> gregg: how might tomorrow's big speech by the president really set the tone and tenor for policy in his second term? >> reporter: very important. saw president bush try to do this in 2005
presidential overreach in second terms. we are very cautious about that. on the other hand, i didn't get re-elected just to bask in re-election. >> michael, he does not sound like he is going to be basking in much of anything other than -- >> no sign of it. >> the torrent of hate mail and support from some corners. i wonder on the eve of this inauguration whether -- what do you think of the to do list that the president has, and to put it in some context for us. we know he has limited -- a fairly limited amount of time to get this done. is this a little ambitious? is the roster too much? >> probably not, but you have to remember what his experience was at the beginning of the first term zoosh right. >> most presidents can come in and people will say what are your priorities and here's my list. obama had so many things coming at him from every single direction that this is in a way almost like a first term. a person coming in for the first time, you know, giving us a little bit of an idea of what he would like to do. sure. his list is much too ambitious. he knows that. most second term presidents, a
of american freedom and democracy. for the 57th time in our history, a president freely elected by the people is being sworn in to office. just before noon at the capitol, barack obama will take the oath for his second term as president. this is a ceremonial swearing-in because the constitution requires the president to be sworn in on january 20th, and this year the 20th fell on sunday. so the president took the official oath in private yesterday in the blue room at the white house. the oath administered by the chief justice john roberts, jr. the public swearing-in and all the pomp and circumstance that go with it were put off until today and what a day it is. the temperature right now is in the high 30s. the sky is clear, a brilliant winter's day in the nation's capital. people are pouring into the national mall to witness a day of history. the first family began the day by attending services at st. john's church. that's right across the street from the white house. that's a long-standing tradition for presidents on inauguration day. joining me now in our cbs coverage is bob schieffer, our c
system for medicare. that was, you know, pretty much trounced during the election. but we'll see. you need something with big numbers in order to -- [inaudible] more or less it's probably a smaller debt ceiling increase. and they also need to decide what to do about two other fiscal cliffs that are looming, the $85 billion in sequester cuts that had been put off for two months for the fiscal cliff deal and also the continuing resolution, government funding runs out march 27th. and if a bill's not passed, the government will shut down. now, some thought that republicans would be more willing to use that weapon to try to force cuts because a government shutdown is several orders of latitude less serious than a debt ceiling default. but, you know, behind the scenes appropriators have been working out their differences, and they could act quickly if leadership decided they didn't want to use that weapon to sort of pass the bill. >> l and finally, eric wasson, you report that the white house has sold paul ryan, the house budget chairman, that its budget will be late, missing the deadline.
to do which is represent the people of the united states. we have a democratically elected republic and people need to pull out their history books and find out what that is and realize that when we send them to office, would give them the authority to vote the way we feel and if we feel they are not representing our opinions and needs, we need to replace them. thank you very much. host: stephen dinan will be joining us at the bottom of the hour. later, author and historian richard norton smith will dig in the details of the second term and what this president could be facing. this headline is from "the washington examiner" -- the public information officer for the u.s. capitol police is joining us on the fund. guest: for having me. host: we look at the seams around washington, what can visitors expect tomorrow? guest: they should expect that we will do our best to protect people. give time to get through lines and things of that nature. host: this is a map we found this morning in "the washington post." the area in red it will be the high-security area. many of the roads around the
that for all the purposes that people send us to congress or elect us to public office, whether it's county executive or a member of congress, is they expect us to do what is right for them when they are in most need of our help. many things we can do for ourselves, but some things are just beyond the most determined resourceful -- determined, resourceful, operational people can do and that is when a natural disaster strikes. so while we have had our conversations about what should be in the bill and how the bill should be bifurcated or in this case trifurcated and all the rest, when we have this vote today it will sweep away some of the concerns that people have about whether this assistance is going to actually show up. 79 days, 79 days since hurricane sandy struck the region. last year it was irene that struck much of the same area. some of the people haven't really fully recovered from that. whether it was the small business owner or homeowner or whatever, and now sandy. such a tremendous force. others have talked about, how do you mitigate for such a thing? how do you address issues re
. the challenge to us is to remember what we learned when we first entered this movement, that you never elect someone to make change happen for you. you elect somebody to make it a little easier for your movement to keep on making change after. and so, brothers and sisters, i implore you tonight, have a good time, party caressed well, then get right back on the battlefield tuesday morning because we took our democracy back and we ain't giving it up to nobody. thank you and god bless. fire it up. fire it up. fire it up! god bless you all. >> that was president of the naacp, benjamin jealous, speaking at the peace ball, voices of hope and resistance come here in washington, d.c. on sunday night. we will be back with more from the peace ball couldn't angela davis, sonia sanchez and others in a moment. ♪ [music break] >> sweet honey in the rock performing at the peace ball last night. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we are broadcasting from washington, d.c., bringing you special coverage of today's inauguration as hundreds of thousands gath
political seers? >> you get elected officials you deserve, and i know this. i'm a politician. they respond to pressure and respond. so we always push the attention to washington or to trenton, albany, or city hall, but we can organize. we have the power to exercise pressure, demands, influence on our elected officials. .. >> when kids stand up in certain neighborhoods and kids stand up in more affluent neighborhoods s and they say those words, "liberty and justice for all," that phrase should be a command, should be a compelling aspiration. and there should be a conscious conviction amongst us to make that real. but right now we are lacking that sense of urgency. and we can't sit around and wait for elected leaders to do it, because when i think about great movements in america, i don't really think that they were led by elected officials. elected officials were often responding to the pressure or responding to the leadership on the ground. and that's really what we should be doing. when we're thinking about voting, conversations, debates, how can we have an entire presidential debate, and
to run for elected office. >> none? that's a flat no. >> that's it. i have no plans. absolutely. >> okay. well, thank you very much. thanks for joining us today. we'll follow, of course, your crusade, your campaign with mayor bloomberg on the issue of guns. >> okay. thank you, andrea. thank you for having me. >> at least 40 hostages, including americans, are believed to have been taken hostage on a raid on an algerian gas plant. there are wlikting reports about the state of the hostage crisis. joining me now nbc news chief pentagon correspondent jim miklacevski. >> what is the pentagon telling you and leon panetta was travel and has been talking to reporters along the way, but do we know more about exactly what happened in this shoot-out? >> u.s. officials all along have said the details are murky, and here's what we know and what we don't know. about seven hours almost 24 hours after the hostages were taken by those armed militants, al qaeda-linked militants at that bp malgas plant there in algeria, the algerian military launched what was supposed to be a hostage rescue operation. as we
and school safety. a night to remember for the obamas and for the nation that re-elected the president. i'm steve handelsman, nbc news, washington. >>> president obama never used the words "democrat" or "republican" in his second inaugural address, but his political message was clear, progressive policies along with a directive for leaders that define us as individuals and as a country. >> the commitments we make to each other through medicare and medicaid and social security, these things do not sap our initiative, they strengthen us. they do not make us a nation of takers. they free us to take the risks that make this country great. we will respond to the threat of climate change. knowing that the failure to do so would betray our children and future generations. we, the people, still believe that enduring security and lasting peace do not require perpetual war. and we must be a source of hope to the poor, the sick, the marginalized, the victims of prejudice. our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law. our journey is not com
" with more on the israeli election. >> neil: thank you very much. we don't have anything to add on what is going on in houston. it appears the worst is behind us and stability has returned there. if there is anything new on that, i will bring it to you. for now, there does not appear be to be. but we have two fast-moving developments, concurrently with that. the cold weather in the united states, the cold shoulder to benjamin netanyahu, who survives to fight another day, but barely. but first, fox on top of some bone-chilling cold. caribou, maine, the temperature is expected to hit 20 below zero. minus 15 in duluth, minnesota -- that's the actual temperature. add in the wind and it was as low as minus 60 degrees in mount washington, new hampshire. new york city, the windchill, making it feel like a balm i 6 degrees, not just the freezing tnchs parts of pennsylvania and western new york, socked with upwards of two feet of snow, snow squalls and thunder-snow as they are calling it, wreaking havoc throughout the midwest. >> this is some of the worst viseen. >> it's been quite a day. >> dri
everything. >> rose: and what did it change for you? >> y know, i got elected in '94 and i'm sure you remember, charlie, in 1993 you had waco, you also had ruby ridge, you had a couple of incidences, tragedies, that really inflamed the right and made gun ownership far more symbolic. for me, though, over the past year it wasn't just newtown, though newtown was really the final straw for me, the tragedy of that day, it was also the fact that a realization as a parent that it's not safe now to send our children to schools or to send them to malls or even movie theaters or religious services. that what once was the exception is now becoming the rule. we can expect these type of mass shootings as a part of american life and i personally believe it's a combination of many things frfrplt violent american culture to mental health issues to gun issues. i think that's one of three issues. ideologues on both sides will disagree with -- take exception to one or two of those problems, but for me that is not about symbolism anymore, it's about saving children's lives and if it's true that dick chen
a breath, threat leaders that have been elected do their jobs. nobody wants to pay anymore taxes. they take 38% out of my check every week in taxes. i get back maybe $1,000 if i'm lucky. the president has a lot on his plate. he is one man speaking for 600 million. how is that to get up in the morning and realize you have everybody in the entire united states looking for you to make the right choice. host: the population in the united states is 300 million. caller: i'm sorry, even 300 million, that's one man speaking for everybody. he's got to make the right decision every second of the day. that's impossible. the country -- the laws we have in place, they've been there. they do work, just everyone has to abide by the laws. everyone should be treated equally. hypothank you for your calls and comments. a tweet -- hypocoming -- host: coming up we'll be talking about the fiscal situation in their cities and the comments yesterday by vice president biden who addressed the 300 mares in attendance on guns and gun violence. and late ter president's promises, what did he fulfill in his first term. a
and the disconnect of their desire of the elected officials. they need to know the american public supports them so they can step up and lead. we have begun to see that. let's keep this up. with all the lead changed the paradigm to if we can do something about guns, to when. david cay needs to know we already have over to their support in the house of representatives for a ban on high-capacity magazines at the end of the one of the 12th congress. we're in of the realm of possibility. if it takes is board -- years from now, we will still be fighting. we understand how the lives we can really save. >> can you talk about the significance of the 19 executive actions the president is also set to announce later today, colin goddard? texas republican steve stockman has threatened impeachment in the event the president uses the executive actions to limit gun- control. he said to attack the president's actions are not just an attack on the constitution and a violation of his sworn the oath of office, they are a direct attack on americans that placed all of us in danger." >> you know, still reviewing all of
at the 2012 election and ahead to the inauguration with the obama campaign's internet guru, harper reed. >> we basically built what amounted to an ad-tech company, but instead of targeting ads on the internet, of course we did that, we really maximized the targeting that's physical. what that means is we're not wasting anyone's time. >> brown: and we examine the fallout from tour de france champion lance armstrong's admission that he used performance enhancing drugs. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. anby contribionso yo pbs statn from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: president obama called today for what amounts to a national awakening to stop gun deaths in america. he detailed an action plan, all the while acknowledging that the most far-reaching measures face tough going in congress. >> we can't put this off any longer. >> su
him to beat hillary clinton and beat john mccain in the 2008 general election and it's important to note that four years ago as president obama was taking the oath of office, there were 140,000 troops in iraq, now that number is just 200. so a pretty significant change in that country and certainly one of the issues that maybe we're not talking about as much as we should be. >> all right. mark murray, nbc new senior political editor. thank you, sir. >> thanks, craig. >> a potential breakthrough is being treated with skepticism. house republicans on friday announced a plan to extend the debt ceiling deadline until mid-april. >> we will extend the debt limit until the timeline when you have a budget and a road map so you stop digging yourself in the hole. part of not having the budget is what's gotten us into this problem in the first place. >> of course, at stake here is the credibility of the u.s. economy and the united states can befall to the national debt and it does not increase the bar. joining me now is the political staff writer, art shapiro, white house correspondent for
maps they do in the house they want to apply for the presidential election in every state they can get away with it. we have a ban on the show talking about 2016. this is a corner stone, nobody is allowed to talk about the 2016 election, at least until next november. this is not about who the candidates will be, this is about whether or not they vote for a democratic candidate, any democratic candidate, this is about whether or not it results in us having a democratic president. this is going on in the states right now. hey, beltway, wake up. >>> a helicopter crashes into a crane in london. >>> snow causing trouble for commuters today. >>> later today, president obama will offer the most xensz extensive proposals to curb gun rules. aenchts 150,000 kids could be stranded this morning and one world trade center is one step closer to reaching 1776 feet. good morning. we begin with breaking news in london today. black smoke was seen rising into the sky during the morning rush hour. a helicopter crashed into a construction crane and then crashed near the river thames. the chopper fell and b
't get elected to be the governor when he ran again. and so he has had support of tyson ever since then. when the clinton administration came into office, they facilitated privatizing meat inspection. now the obama administration is trying take a step further. the clinton administration privatized it in the processing. animals are slaughtered and then they go through another step where they are cut up and processed and packaged. in the processing, privatized system and we have done a lot of work showing how dangerous it is. now the obama administration wants to increase the program, especially for poultry. more than 200 birds a minute of being sent in slaughtered. that is not a misstatement. 200 birds a minute. there is no way there can be any inspection and these are immigrant workers doing extremely dangerous work. people sense that sliced, all sorts of horrible injuries. because of all of the contamination from salmonella, i can't really eat chicken. dip the chicken into chemicals and not really originated with the clinton administration. >> i don't know how much time we have. are th
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 135 (some duplicates have been removed)